The first six months are the "main growth phase". They require high quality protein and nutrients.

The next 6- 12 months require a reduced protein content to help prevent any growth disorders.

 

 

Download our puppy guide here - full of lots of information.

Healthy adult dog food

Now fully grown, finding the right diet to match their energy requirements is key. 

Senior dog food

Now in old age, diets with a lower fat and phosphorus are needed.

Winter Care for Your Furry Friends

Temperatures are dropping and the darker evenings are creeping in which indicates winter is just around the corner. This means a little extra care will be needed for your four-legged friend during this cold time of year. Here are our top five Happy Dog Tips to care for your dog this wintertime:

1. Beware of Antifreeze- It Could Kill Your Dog

Ice cold conditions generally means motorists bring the antifreeze out of the cupboard and unfortunately it’s highly toxic to dogs. Worse still, it has a sweet smell and taste meaning your dog may not think twice about its consumption which sadly can be fatal. Therefore, never leave open containers lying around and clean up any spills as quickly as possible.

 

2. Protect Your Dog’s Paws

Icy conditions also means roads and pavements will be gritted. This can really take its toll on your dog’s paws whilst out walking. Clean and dry your dog’s feet after every walk if this is the case.  

3. Help Your Dog if he Feels the Cold

If your dog has a short coat or you see him shivering he may need a winter coat for those cold morning and evening walks.  

4. Feeding Your Dog Through Winter

What you feed throughout the winter months will depend on your dog’s age, weight and energy levels. A working dog that spends most of his time outdoors is likely to require more calories during the cold months, whereas a dog that is less active may need reduced rations or a food with less fats and calories. Keep a close eye on your dog’s weight and adjust his food accordingly.

5. Take Extra Care of Your Senior Dog

Older dogs don’t always deal with the cold very well as they are unable to regulate their body temperatures as effectively as younger dogs; this makes them more susceptible to winter colds and again they may require a winter coat. The cold can also take its toll on their muscles and joints so take care with exercise levels and look into some extra food supplementation to help with their joint health.